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Tone of Writing: Complete Guide to the Types of Tone in Writing, Tone Conversion, and Examples

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Tone of Writing Complete Guide to the Types of Tone in Writing, Tone Conversion, and Examples

Tone of Writing Complete Guide to the Types of Tone in Writing, Tone Conversion, and Examples

The tone of writing is the manner in which something has been written. It can be described as having a certain feeling or mood and it often reflects the writer’s point of view. The tone of writing may create an overall impression that influences how people feel about what they read, whether positively or negatively.

There are many different types of tone in writing—such as authoritative, questioning, or argumentative—but which one should you use? And how do these affect how your readers feel?

Here’s our guide to the most common tones for writing. When you use Outranking, you can have our AI write text with a particular tone of voice, or you can have it automatically rewrite sections to change the tone. See the end of this article to learn how.

What is the definition of tone of writing?

A tone of writing shows an author’s attitude or intent. Tone is the essence of the voice, which is how a writer conveys their thoughts to the reader. Tone can be found through specific words, phrases, and sentence structures.

Tone can also reveal how certain parts of a written work are meant to be interpreted by readers. For example, one could use irony or sarcasm when describing something unpleasant to demonstrate how terrible it was.

Tone is a significant element in writing. Tone can be conveyed through diction, syntax, viewpoint, composition, and theme. The tone of the author’s language is easy to detect because it has an impact on how the reader perceives what they are reading or listening to.

What are the importance and purpose of tone of writing?

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Tone is the overall feeling that a piece of writing conveys. Tone can be positive, negative, or neutral. The selected tone can impact how readers interpret what is written and what they think about the subject. It can also affect how people perceive a writer and their work.

When writing, an author has to consider what they want their audience to feel. The purpose of tone is not only to convey facts and information but also to elicit emotions from your reader through persuasion. A writer must be careful in choosing which kind of emotion or persuasive element works best for them and what type of relationship it creates with their readership.

Tone can build a connection between reader and writer by eliciting an emotional response; you should make sure that your message is credible to your audience.

Moreover, tone can be used to get your reader interested in what you write about. It’s an important tactic that uses emotion and persuasion to make the content more appealing. The purpose of writing with a certain tone is not always clear when starting out, but it can help to generate emotions or influence decision-making based on how people feel at a given time while reading.

The tone of writing is an important part of the content marketing strategy. Content marketers should use it to influence readers and convince them that they are on their side, even if the content is not meant to be a sales pitch or ad campaign.

Every piece of content ultimately needs its own deliberate tone because different audiences respond differently to certain tones. If you want your audience to engage with your brand, use the right tone for each type of article so that they feel the message you’re trying to convey.

The tone should be used as an emotional motivator so that the reader will want to read further and share your content with others.

What are the 9 most important and common types of tone?

1. Appreciative

An appreciative tone is usually used when the writer has just finished something that they really enjoyed or were impressed by. The appreciation of a piece might be experienced differently depending on what the reader first saw in it, but an appreciative tone should always come across as honest and genuine. An appreciative tone can show that the writer not only enjoyed something but can also show their gratitude.

Examples of sentences with an appreciative tone include:

– I loved your essay!

– That’s amazing; you’re so talented!

2. Cautionary

A cautionary tone is typically used when something potentially dangerous or negative might happen. This type of tone uses harsh language and treats its subject very seriously. A cautionary tone often comes with warnings, which are usually accompanied by phrases like “be careful” or “watch out.”

Examples of sentences with a cautionary tone include:

– Be careful driving in this area without your seatbelt on!

– Watch out for that crazy driver who just pulled out into traffic.

3. Diplomatic

A diplomatic tone is notably used in communications between countries and for other international relationships. A diplomatic tone usually has a cautious undertone to it, as the writer doesn’t want to make any assumptions; they instead show that they are open-minded. The voices in this type of writing often have a detached quality that makes them sound formal and sometimes even distant from what is being discussed.

Examples of sentences with a diplomatic tone include:

– It’s still unclear if we can trust these guys.

– Some people may struggle to believe what you’re saying.

4. Direct

A direct tone is usually used in writing when the writer directly expresses what they are thinking. The text is written with a straightforward attitude without any sugar-coating or careful phrasing. The tone can appear to be honest, blunt, and straightforward, at times making the reader feel that they are being spoken to personally by someone who perhaps looks down on them because of their failures or lack of knowledge.

Examples of sentences with a direct tone include:

– Your essay was very short!

– This problem is difficult to solve.

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5. Enthusiastic

An enthusiastic tone is typically used in writing when the writer is excited about something. The tone is often inviting and welcoming, even if it’s not quite clear why they are excited. Sentences might use exclamations like “Awesome!” An enthusiastic tone can also involve repetition of words for emphasis, such as using phrases like “Wow, wow, wow!”

Examples of sentences with an enthusiastic tone include:

– I know you’re up to this challenge!

– You must try their tacos—no way there’s anything better than these.

6. Informative

An informative tone is generally used in writing when the writer wants to impart knowledge about something. The information might be obtained through research or experience, but it’s usually clear that this type of communication is not personal opinion or speculation on the subject matter. Sentences with an informative tone are typically objective and factual, with little-to-no use of emotionality. A sentence with an informative tone would most likely come from a teacher explaining something to their students during class time; they may also take up this style for instructional material written by experts in particular fields.

Examples of sentences with an informative tone include:

– You should avoid drinking alcohol within six hours before taking your medicine because it will interfere with its effectiveness.- Aloe vera is a popular plant in many countries, and it has been used as an important medicinal ingredient throughout the world.

7. Inspirational

An inspirational tone is often used when somebody needs encouragement and support. Inspirational writing typically focuses on encouraging people to follow their dreams and find strength in themselves. The tone of an inspirational piece of writing is typically positive with a sense of hope, optimism, or inspiration for the future that can help motivate others into taking risks.

Examples of sentences with an inspirational tone include:

– I know you’re committed to this project! Good luck with it!

– Keep fighting your hardest; never give up!

8. Thoughtful

A thoughtful tone is often used in writing when the writer expresses their feelings of caring about something. This type of tone focuses on an individual’s thoughts and emotions, rather than their actions.

Examples of sentences with a thoughtful tone include:

– She told me that she loved me.

– I care about your success, so I think you should take this seriously.

9. Witty

Witty writing often uses humor to make a point. A witty tone is typically more informal than an authoritative tone and can express playfulness or annoyance. This type of voice would fit well in blog posts, personal stories, or other writings that take place within the writer’s own life.

Examples of sentences with a witty tone include:

– The thing about this job is that it’s not what you expect after you get hired!

– My mom suggested I write about my experience. She doesn’t even know what my experience was!

150+ types of tones and examples

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Absurd

Some people might find this tone funny or silly, while others may conclude that it is inappropriate depending on the topic. The absurdity of a sentence can help express frustration in an otherwise serious situation by using humor. This could be useful when you are trying to explain your feelings towards something but struggle to put them into words.

Examples of sentences with an absurd tone include:

– It’s just incredible how much money we made today! I hope we broke even.

– Wow, look at all these hungry mosquitoes hovering around me!

Accusatory

An accusatory tone is used to express anger or irritation. This type of writing often appears in an article when someone feels wronged by another person, company, or group.

Examples of sentences with an accusatory tone include:

– If you are too lazy to do your job properly, then I don’t want you working for me anymore!

– You’re not nearly as important as you think you are!

Acerbic

An acerbic tone is often used when the writer feels anger towards somebody or something. The writing can also be harsh and critical of topics that are not serious in nature. Acerbic writing tends to use sarcasm, irony, bitterness, cynicism, and scornfulness rather than just straightforward criticism to make their point clear.

Examples of sentences with an acerbic tone include:

– You’re the only thing holding me back.

– I can’t believe they wouldn’t refund my five bucks!

Admiring

An admiring tone often appears in writing when people are expressing their admiration, respect, or love for something or someone. The tone can take different forms, from being complimentary to being entertaining. While an admiring tone is typically less formal than a commanding tone, it displays confidence and enthusiasm. Sentences in an admiring tone usually have a positive connotation.

Examples of sentences with an admiring tone include:

– I love your work!

– This beautiful dress looks amazing on you!

Aggressive

An aggressive tone is often used when somebody feels like they are in an argument or confrontation. It can be found in sentences that express anger, frustration, and other negative emotions. This type of writing might also contain threats to the person being talked about, as well as warnings for how they should behave in future encounters with the writer.

Examples of sentences with an aggressive tone include:

– You better tell your boss where you’re going next time!

– Just stay away from me.

Aggrieved

An aggrieved tone can be defined as showing bitterness, anger, resentment, or disappointment. The writer might also incorporate words such as “sorry” and “regret.” The tone is typically harsh.

Examples of sentences with an aggrieved tone include:

– I’m sorry you feel that way.

– I regret to say that I’m not going anywhere.

Altruistic

An altruistic tone is often used when people are trying to emphasize the struggles of another individual or group. An altruistic tone shows empathy and understanding for others, without making them feel bad about themselves. Typically, it appears in writing that’s meant to give hope for those struggling with something difficult in life. An altruistic tone appears most frequently when someone needs encouragement or help.

Examples of sentences with an altruistic tone include:

– You’re not alone; there are thousands just like you who have gone through this same struggle!

– I struggled after my divorce, but now I’m happier than ever before; you’ll get there too. I’m here for you.

Ambivalent

An ambivalent tone is the opposite of a passionate tone. It usually appears in writing when people are expressing their lack of enthusiasm. This type of sentence typically has a negative connotation as it suggests that somebody does not like or care about the subject, nor do they want them to continue the conversation.

Examples of sentences with an ambivalent tone include:

– I don’t know if I can make it to dinner tonight.

– I don’t have much to say about him.

Amused

An amused tone is used in writing when the writer thinks something is humorous. The tone may be sympathetic or mocking, but it’s usually not very serious. Amused sentences typically have an informal and conversational style that reflects a sense of playfulness.

Examples of sentences with an amused tone include:

– I know how you feel about homework.

– Let’s just laugh at this together. 

Angry

An angry tone is typically used when the writer wants to convey a sense of frustration or outrage. It can take different forms, such as passive-aggressive, defensive, or sarcastic. Think about how strong your anger is; if that’s what you want people reading your writing to feel, then perhaps an angry tone is appropriate in this situation.

Examples of sentences with an angry tone include:

– I’m so mad right now!

– You need more than just luck—that won’t help you win this competition.

Animated

An animated tone is typically used in writing to express the writer’s excitement for something. For example, a sentence with an animated tone would be appropriate when telling somebody about how their favorite sports team won a big game or when giving them exciting news about someone they love. Sentences in an animated voice often include words such as “amazing” and “incredible.”

Examples of sentences with an animated tone include:

– Did you see that dunk?

– I can’t believe it’s been ten years since we started dating!

Apathetic

An apathetic tone is typically used when the writer feels that they are not motivated to do something. It can be seen in someone who does not care about what is happening to someone else or has given up on their own efforts.

Examples of sentences with an apathetic tone include:

– I guess you’re out of luck today.

– I tried my best, but there’s nothing I can do for you.

Apologetic

An apologetic tone is similar to a humble tone. Apologetic writing usually appears when the writer feels regretful or embarrassed about something they have done or said that has caused harm to somebody else. An apologetic tone is sincere and doesn’t seek an apology from the other party.

An apologetic tone often lasts across multiple sentences, taking responsibility for what happened by admitting fault—at least partially—and apologizing repeatedly.

Examples of sentences with an apologetic tone include:

– I’m sorry if I offended you with my choice of words. I didn’t mean anything bad at all!

– I’m really sorry about this.

Ardent

An ardent tone is typically used when people are expressing their strong feelings towards something or someone. The tone often comes across as passionate and emotional, with sentences usually having a warm or positive connotation. An ardent tone could be found in writing that discusses any topic where the writer strongly supports a particular viewpoint, such as in politics or religion.

Examples of sentences with an ardent tone include:

– I really think the party is on the right track.

– You’re not guilty until proven guilty!

Arrogant

An arrogant tone is typically used when the writer feels superior to other people. Arrogant writing often displays condescension and dismissal of others. Sentences with an arrogant tone tend to be critical or belittling towards the reader or subject.

Examples of sentences using an arrogant tone include:

– I’m not enjoying myself tonight because you’re here.

– You probably couldn’t even find the way home from your own driveway.

Assertive

An assertive tone is usually used in writing when the writer is trying to make a strong point. An assertive tone can be seen as bossy or demanding, but it also means that the author knows what they are talking about and has confidence in their opinion. Sentences with an assertive tone often have confident statements like “I know.”

Examples of sentences with an assertive tone include:

– We need to book soon if we want this place for our wedding ceremony.

– I know I’ll never wear those shoes again!

Awestruck

An awestruck tone is usually used when the writer is describing something that impresses them. An awestruck tone can be blissfully romantic. Awestruck writing speaks more to emotions than logic. It often takes on a naïve quality and describes people who are feeling thrilled about what they see.

Examples of sentences with an awestruck tone include:

– The sky was absolutely beautiful.

–  I am so amazed by his singing.

Belligerent

A belligerent tone is typically used when a writer wants to express anger or irritation. This type of tone is often aggressive and can be frightening, depending on the circumstances. A belligerent tone usually means that the speaker feels they are being wronged in some way. It often means that someone is expressing their thoughts as if they were screaming at somebody else. Writing with a belligerent tone might include swear words.

Examples of sentences with a belligerent tone include:

– This blog article was so inaccurate!

– You’re going down now!

Benevolent

A benevolent tone is often used to express sentiments of love, affection, and appreciation. This type of writing focuses on helping others. Sentences with a benevolent tone might include phrases like “for you” because they reflect an offer of assistance. A sentence with a benevolent tone is also appropriate when complimenting someone.

Examples of sentences with a benevolent tone include:

– I found this marvelous video for you about birds!

– You look wonderful today!

Bitter

A bitter tone is typically used when somebody has been hurt or let down. This can be shown in many ways, such as sarcasm or mocking the person that had wronged them. The tone is usually a negative one, with a focus on pain rather than positivity.

Examples of sentences with a bitter tone include:

– I was so excited to have dinner at my favorite restaurant, only for you to steal my seat!

– If he doesn’t give me back what’s mine, he’ll regret it.

Callous

The tone of callous writing tends to be cold, harsh, and without sympathy. The tone can also show aggression or anger. Callous sentences are usually negative in nature with the writer expressing something offensive about the subject.

Examples of sentences with a callous tone include:

– That’s disgusting!

– I hate this place!

Candid

A candid tone is typically used when the writer is speaking about something they are not completely sure about. A candid sentence has a non-judgmental or neutral stance towards whatever it discusses, making the reader feel safe and accepted.

Examples of sentences with a candid tone include:

– I know you’ve been feeling terrible lately, but don’t lose hope yet!

– I’m not even sure how that works. Are you?

Caustic

A caustic tone is negative and bitter. It usually appears when the writer has an issue with something or somebody that they are discussing. A caustic tone can be very sharp in its delivery of sarcasm, insults, and harsh words—anything to make the point clear, even if it hurts someone’s feelings. It can also be used as humor.

A caustic tone appears most commonly in arguments when one person becomes more angry than constructive. This type of discourse relies more heavily on negative emotions than on logic. This particular voice often leaves a negative impression.

Examples of sentences with a caustic tone include:

– I knew the day would come when you’d do something this stupid. Now I have to fire you.

– How dare you talk about my dog like that!

Celebratory

A celebratory tone is typically used when somebody has accomplished something positive. Sometimes the tone is not directed towards a particular person, but instead reflects a general situation or event that occurred. The celebratory tone can be found in writing when people are expressing their happiness with the past year as well as looking forward to the next one.

Examples of sentences with a celebratory tone include:

– Happy holidays!

– It’s been so long since I’ve seen you last. It was great catching up today!

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Chatty

A chatty tone is typically used when talking in a casual, friendly way. It’s more about the relationship between the two people than anything else. The tone can take different forms, like being playful or even affectionate at times.

A chatty tone is often easy to understand and doesn’t need much context because it sounds conversational; however, words may not flow naturally when there is a rigid set of topics to cover. A chatty voice can be useful for providing information on certain television newscasts because it can be used to discuss graphs and data while effectively keeping listeners entertained.

Examples of sentences with a chatty tone include:

– Hey, how have you been?

– What are your thoughts on the new karaoke app you downloaded last week?

Colloquial

A colloquial tone typically involves slang or informal language. A colloquial tone can be found in day-to-day conversation and it often has a casual, friendly connotation. The word “sucks” would signal this type of writing because it conveys negativity but is also conversational English. Other common words include “totally” and “awesome.” A colloquial tone is common in children’s books.

Examples of sentences with a colloquial tone include:

– I’m totally gonna win!

– I need to get outta here.

Comic

A comic voice is typically used in writing when the writer is trying to make somebody laugh or find humor in a situation. It can be sarcastic, purposefully making fun of people and their actions, but it usually carries a warmer sense of wit. While a comic tone can take different forms depending on the topic, it often shows that the author is enjoying whatever they’re talking about and wants others to feel like they’ve had a good time too.

Examples of sentences with comic tone include:

– I love you more than anything! Except for my shoes.

– This movie was so bad that we all died laughing!

Compassionate

A compassionate tone is typically used when the writer feels deeply affected by someone else’s situation. Compassionate writing often uses adjectives to describe emotions, including words like “sad,” “angry,” and “scared.” Sentences with a compassionate tone of voice may be concise to make their point clear but also leave the reader or listener space to think and respond.

Examples of sentences with a compassion tone include:

– I’m sorry you’re feeling down.

– It must be hard being away from your family during Thanksgiving.

Complex

A complex tone is typically used when the writer wants to convey more than one message. This tone may include multiple meanings that are not always apparent, even after careful reading of the text. 

The complexity can be seen in the way that specific words, phrases, and sentences fit together. This type of writing’s main point is uncovered by analyzing each paragraph as a whole.

Examples of sentences with a complex tone include:

– It was an interesting read for anyone who enjoys good references to quality literature, but I personally found that previous knowledge on the philosophy and ancient history mentioned throughout the novel was required.

– Norman had just left his car at home because he knew he would need his bike later. He was about to make an important trip that nobody else knew about.

Compliant

A compliant tone is typically found in writing when someone is following recommendations or orders. The tone usually sounds respectful. While it usually seems like the writer wants to please their readers or listeners, they may be subtly demanding something in return for this compliance. Sentences with a compliant tone usually connote a relationship with authority and describe situations where explicit or implicit rules are followed.

Examples of sentences with a compliant tone include:

– I’ll make sure to bring my ID next time.

– We will stay off your property.

Concerned

When people express concern, the tone usually conveys an air of empathy for what is being discussed. This can be seen in writing as a low-key way to express emotions and thoughts about something worrying or troublesome. Usually, this type of tone reveals itself with phrases like “I’m afraid that” or “My apologies if.”

Examples of sentences with a concerned tone include:

– I hope everything is okay over there.

– Were things not going well?

Conciliatory

A conciliatory tone is typically used when the writer is trying to improve the state of a conflict by making somebody feel better. A conciliatory tone, while not always positive, considers that people have different opinions on a certain subject. The author tries their best to make sure that both parties’ voices are understood. This can take many forms of language, but often contains calming phrases like “I’m sorry,” or “let’s talk.”

Examples of sentences with a conciliatory tone include:

– I shouldn’t have shouted at you last night. Let me explain what happened.

– I think that I was ultimately the cause of that disagreement.

Condescending

A condescending tone is only used in writing when the writer has a superior position over the audience, or as a joke. The tone can be snobbish or rude, but might be used to teach somebody something that they might not know already, but should. This type of tone often does not feel very formal, because it feels very much like being lectured.

Examples of sentences with a condescending tone include:

– You have been playing this game for too long without any real knowledge about strategy. I will show you how it should really be played.

– This will be a difficult task for you to master, but I will help you buckle down and improve.

Confused

A confused tone is typically used when the writer is unsure about something or having a hard time understanding. A confused tone is often found in written texts where people don’t completely comprehend and need more clarification. This may also be used to express distress about an awful event that has happened when past experiences don’t seem to indicate the path forward.

Examples of sentences with a confused tone include:

– I’m really not sure how this works. Can you help me?

– What did he say about me?

Contemptuous

A contemptuous tone is typically used when the writer is expressing their distaste, scorn, or dislike. When somebody uses this tone, they often want to belittle and humiliate the subject in question. The intent of a sentence with a contemptuous tone often is mocking or ridiculing somebody else’s opinions on a topic.

Examples of sentences with a contemptuous tone include:

– I don’t know why you think your opinion matters so much to me anyway!

– Did you even look at these papers? They’re terrible!

Critical

A critical tone can be the opposite of an encouraging tone. However, a critical tone may not always seek to make the audience feel bad. It can also be a way of offering feedback for improvement or to help someone learn to perform under pressure. Sentences with a critical tone are associated with criticism, but they may also be paired with positive or encouraging statements.

Examples of sentences with a critical tone include:

– You’re slipping with this project!

– You need to keep working just as hard as you have been until now.

Cruel

A cruel tone is one that usually comes from an antagonist and conveys the hope that harm or violence come upon somebody. It’s often utilized as a storytelling tool. A cruel tone often targets the audience’s emotions by questioning their motivations or values without offering any solutions to those problems.

Examples of sentences with a cruel tone include:

– I hope you die in prison!

– You aren’t worth anything.

Curious

A curious tone is typically used when expressing interest in something or someone that the writer hasn’t experienced before.

Examples of sentences with a curious tone include:

– What’s that animal?

– What should I know about Italy?

Cynical

A cynical tone is a negative-sounding, skeptical approach. A cynical tone can come across with sarcasm or an air of superiority, possibly mocking others who are trying hard but seem unable to succeed. While some sentences may attack other people, other sentences might have more sincere intentions since this type of writing is typically geared towards reflection and self-improvement rather than the actions of others.

Examples of sentences with a cynical tone include:

– We would never get any customers if we took that approach to our business today.

– People are so lazy.

Defensive

A defensive tone is typically seen in writing when the writer feels threatened. This includes anything that might be perceived as a threat, such as someone else’s opinion. A defensive tone can be used for any situation where fear of criticism or confrontation is present and may address insults, criticisms, and feelings of inadequacy. Sentences with a defensive tone can be quite negative in nature because they tend not to give compliments about a subject but rather focus on how people have found fault with it.

Examples of sentences with a defensive tone include:

– What do you mean by “not good enough”?

– You’re just jealous!

Defiant

A defiant tone can be heard when a writer is trying to challenge or debate something. Though oftentimes it might result in a conflict, the tone itself may not show hostility towards an opponent. It more often comes from feeling frustrated with an idea that is being upheld by others without question and may seek some validation of one’s doubts.

Examples of sentences with a defiant tone include:

– I think the public is wrong on this one!

– I’m going to wear my hair like this whether you agree or not!

Demeaning

A demeaning tone is typically used when the writer is trying to make somebody feel bad about a difficult experience. A demeaning tone often focuses on making the audience feel miserable and worthless to manipulate them into doing something, whether complying with demands or changing their opinion. 

Examples of sentences with a demeaning tone include:

– You’re such an idiot.

– That’s ridiculous!

Depressing

A depressing tone is typically used when the writer needs to emphasize a negative point. A depressing tone conveys sadness, pain, or empathy. This would be appropriate for writing about sad topics such as death and the loss of loved ones. Sentences with a depressing tone often have the word “cannot” in them since they are describing something impossible at this time due to circumstances beyond one’s control.

Examples of sentences with a depressing tone include:

– I cannot believe he has done this again.

– His behavior was so cruel it broke my heart.

Derisive

A derisive tone is typically used when the writer is trying to mock somebody about something they feel. A derisive tone may insult or dehumanize the subject but may also be used as comedy. Sentences with a derisive tone usually have an unpleasant connotation. Derisive writing would usually be inappropriate if written about someone’s feelings of self-worth or intense emotions like love and hate.

Examples of sentences with a derisive tone include:

– You got ditched by your boyfriend? How pathetic!

– The girl chose her over me on the team. Typical.

Detached

A detached tone is used when the writer feels distant from a situation. The tone can be expressive or dry, but it always conveys distance. Detached writing often takes on an impersonal voice, as if telling somebody what they need to know without getting too close to their emotions.

Examples of sentences with a detached tone include:

– She had been crying for hours now and just couldn’t feel anything anymore.

– It’s time to go home now because my work here is complete. I have no idea how long this place will exist once I’m gone.

Dignified

A dignified tone is typically used when the writer wants to convey importance, seriousness, or value. The tone can take different forms from serious to neutral to formal. Though there are many variations of this type of writing style, sentences in a dignified tone tend to have an air that radiates authority without sounding intimidating or demanding.

Examples of sentences with a dignified tone include:

– You’re needed on the team right now, more than ever before!

– I think my work has made some heads turn lately.

Disappointed

A disappointed tone is typically used when something was not received as wanted. The tone can be felt in a letter written to express disappointment for an event that did not occur, such as a wedding invitation being sent with no response. A disappointed tone often reflects the feeling of sadness and frustration over a missed opportunity or loss from someone’s perspective.

Examples of sentences with a disappointing tone include:

– I’m sorry you couldn’t attend our meeting today. It would have been great if you could have come.

– When will my package arrive? It’s already four days late!

Disapproving

A disapproving tone is typically used when the writer is trying to make somebody feel bad about something they are doing. A disapproving tone often attempts to point out mistakes or flaws. This writing style tends to focus on correcting the audience’s behavior, actions, or decisions, even if this hurts their feelings, for change to happen for the better.

Examples of sentences with a disapproving tone include:

– You had no right to leave your family like that!

– I am sorry you’re not happy with me, but this problem isn’t going anywhere on its own.

Disheartening

A disheartening tone is typically used when something has gone wrong and the writer wants to convey a sense of sadness or despair. Sentences in a disheartening tone have negative connotations. Disheartening writing often focuses on pointing out consequences rather than solutions; while this may be helpful for some kinds of problems (in particular if there are no easy options), it can be difficult to read if it does not explain how things might get better.

Examples of sentences with a disheartening tone include:

– I hope you don’t get fired.

– The car was totaled in the accident.

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Disparaging

A disparaging tone can be used in a variety of circumstances, often when the writer is describing a scandal. Disparagement occurs more in written form than in spoken language because it is easier for people to write these types of thoughts on paper.

Examples of sentences with a disparaging tone include:

– We shouldn’t trust them anymore; why should we continue this conversation?

– What did they think would happen? That was obvious!

Dispassionate

A dispassionate tone is typically used when the writer wants to keep their opinions neutral. This type of writing does not take a side or express any personal feelings about something. To be effective, the writer must remain objective and avoid sounding too harsh or judgmental toward anything in particular. A reporter might write with a dispassionate tone if they want readers to hear an unbiased perspective on both sides of a certain topic in a single article.

Examples of sentences with a dispassionate tone include:

– Let’s focus on the facts.

– I don’t know why you’re so angry.

Distressed

A distressed tone in writing is often used when somebody or something has caused a problem. The writer uses a distressed tone to show the audience what has happened and how it makes them feel about the event, person, or situation that just took place. This can be seen in articles where people are talking about difficult experiences in the past.

Examples of sentences with a distressed tone include:

– I’m so ashamed of how this company made me feel about my body while marketing these products!

– My friend is always doing terrible things, like stealing money from others.

Docile

A docile tone is used when a writer wants to express that they are not angry. A docile tone often expresses this through humility and gentleness but can also take other forms depending on the recipient. For example, an apology from someone reflecting on their own mistakes might be expressed using a regretful or humble tone to ask for forgiveness.

Examples of sentences with a docile tone include:

– I don’t really feel angry—I’m just tired today.

– You’re right about that.

Eager

An eager tone is one of pleasure and delight. It typically appears when writing about something in the future that the writer finds very enjoyable or exciting, whether it be a movie or food. Eager sentences are often short but high-spirited, with lots of personal feelings put into them.

Examples of sentences with an eager tone include:

– I cannot wait to see the movie It.

– We had so much fun together last night; we’ve got to do it again sometime soon!

Earnest

An earnest tone is typically used when somebody is being honest or sincere about something. A speaker who speaks in an earnest tone can still have a sense of humor, but they take the situation more seriously than they normally would when joking. An example of this is how people might speak when telling someone that their relative has just passed away and trying to offer comfort. The person speaking with an earnest tone may not sound like themselves at all; however, sincerity can go over better than sarcasm in certain situations.

Examples of sentences with an earnest tone include:

– You must miss her very much right now.

– It’s an unfortunate situation, but I think it will be okay.

Egotistical

An egotistical tone is used when somebody is showing off their accomplishments or talking about themselves in an inflated manner. The tone can sometimes appear as if the writer has no sense of humility, and it may be accompanied by bragging or elitism. A sentence using an egotistical tone usually includes words like “I” and “myself.”

Examples of sentences with an egotistical tone include:

– It’s my company now.

– I’m great at math!

Empathetic

An empathetic tone is typically used when the writer is expressing compassion for someone who has experienced some sort of hardship. Empathy, in this case, can be seen as an act of love and care rather than pity. In contrast with sympathy, empathy means understanding someone’s feelings, whether or not you share them. An empathetic tone describes writing that offers support to its audience by providing understanding without judgment or criticism.

Examples of sentences with an empathetic tone include:

– It’s hard to imagine how she felt during her darkest moment.

– I know you’re trying your best.

Encouraging

An encouraging tone is typically used when the writer is trying to motivate somebody to tackle a challenge. An encouraging tone is about positivity. Encouraging writing is clear and makes the audience feel good. Usually, an encouraging tone attempts to boost the audience’s mood or strengthen their determination towards achieving a particular goal.

Examples of sentences with an encouraging tone include:

– I really believe that you can do it!

– You’re doing great work here today.

Evasive

An evasive tone is typically used when the writer does not want to answer a question. It can be found in writing where someone does not want to disclose some sensitive information, such as admitting guilt or divulging personal information. An evasive tone also works well with topics that are deemed taboo by society and topics about which many people have strong opinions.

Examples of sentences with an evasive tone include:

– I don’t know what you’re talking about.

– What was your name again?

Excited

An excited tone is typically used when a writer conveys his or her enthusiasm for something. This tone implies that the writer feels very positive about a particular topic, which can range from an event to a product. When writing in an excited tone, the speaker often becomes more animated and enthusiastic with each sentence; this can create some humor within the content as well.

Examples of sentences with an excited tone include:

– I’m so happy you’re here!

– The game was really close, but we won at the last second!

Facetious

A facetious tone is often used when the writer and audience are sharing a joke or laughing together. The term “facetious” can describe jokes, banter, repartee, and satire. A facetious dialogue might involve two people talking about something that sounds tricky when they know it’s not difficult. Another type of facetious writing includes sarcasm, which is usually delivered ironically through an exaggerated sense of solemnity as if someone was offended by a benign comment.

Examples of sentences with a facetious tone include:

– How did you manage to get that easy project done in only a year? 

– I’d prefer you say that behind my back!

Flippant

A flippant tone is used to convey the writer’s sarcasm or humor. Flippant writing may be humorous, insulting, or playful in nature and almost always comes across as lighthearted and carefree. Sentences using a flippant tone could have a negative connotation but can also convey an optimistic attitude towards life’s negative experiences.

Examples of sentences with a flippant tone include:

– I know how you feel! Let’s review this spreadsheet line-by-line.

– You must really love that flower if you named it after yourself. Real original!

Forceful

A forceful tone is used when someone wants to get their point across or give an order. This type of writing can be seen as commanding, dominant, or authoritative. A forceful tone often has a negative connotation because it sounds very bossy and strong-willed. Sentences with this tone are usually placed right before what needs to be done so that there will not be any confusion about the writer’s intention for the reader’s actions.

Examples of sentences with a forceful tone include:

– You still have two hours left on your shift!

– You need to clean your room before you leave.

Formal

A formal tone is typically used in writing when the writer has to be professional and respectful. A formal tone is often more polite than a commanding tone but can still come across as condescending or snobbish depending on how the text is written. Sentences with a formal tone may feel uncomfortable if the reader doesn’t understand what’s being talked about.

Examples of sentences with an informal tone include:

– They should have called for help earlier.

– It would be great if you could bring some drinks.

Frank

A frank tone is typically used when a person does not care for the context of what’s going on around them or lacks any interest in continuing the discussion. The writing sounds blunt and direct, almost like talking to somebody face-to-face. Writing with this tone can often sound rude, but the intention behind it is often helpful.

Examples of sentences with a frank tone include:

– You should rethink that!

– I don’t know why you were drinking so much last night, did something happen?

Frustrated

A frustrated tone is typically used when the writer addresses something that has irked them. Frustrated writing usually expresses feelings of anger, annoyance, or frustration towards a specific person or situation.

Examples of sentences with a frustrated tone include:

– I don’t understand why she doesn’t want me to come over and see her house!

– Why can’t we just get one thing done without so much drama?

Funny

A funny tone in writing is typically used to make somebody laugh. It’s usually a casual and lighthearted approach that relies on the audience’s mood, rather than their intellect or capability for change. The tone often appears in written works to describe the comedy of a situation.

Examples of sentences with a funny tone include:

– I can’t believe you ate all those donuts without stopping to breathe!

– He laughed so hard his stomach hurt!

Gentle

A gentle tone is used to communicate difficult information. The tone can be seen in both the written and spoken word and is never confrontational. Gentle writing may appear informal as it often includes the use of “I,” “we,” and “our.”

Examples of sentences with a gentle tone include:

– I’m sorry I caused you pain.

– It’s okay, we’re all still friends here.

Grim

A grim tone is typically used when something bad has happened or a sad event is described. In this type of voice, the speaker feels anger, grief, resignation, or sadness. The person using this kind of writing style might have experienced some sort of tragedy and they are trying to come to terms with it by telling their story in a manner that reflects their feelings about what’s going on around them. Sentences with a grim tone usually have an unhappy connotation and focus on how the writer feels.

Examples of sentences with a grim tone include:

– I hope she doesn’t stab me!

– That was a really unfortunate day.

Hard

A hard tone is often used in writing when the author or speaker feels anger or wants to sound severe. A hard tone tends to be primitive and aggressive, unlike writing that avoids hurting anyone’s feelings. The reader of a sentence written in this tone might feel a sort of aggression from the writer.

Examples of sentences with a hard tone include:

– He just broke the law!

– You just stole my money!

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Humble

A humble tone is typically used when a writer feels insecure or apologetic about themselves. This type of writing can sound almost embarrassed. With an honest, down-to-earth voice, humble writing can make readers feel close enough to relate to the subject matter. A humble tone is often seen as truthful because the author tends to avoid taking credit for their work or accomplishments.

Examples of sentences with a humble tone include:

– It really wasn’t that hard, and I had a lot of help.

– We honestly need your help right now!

Humorous

A humorous tone is typically used when writing about something that isn’t serious. Humor can be used in a variety of ways, such as to make someone laugh or smile or to provide comic relief from an otherwise stressful situation. The tone generally shows a playful nature; it has a positive connotation and feels lighthearted.

Examples of sentences with a humorous tone include:

– I stop by that restaurant every day. Even when they’re closed.

– My dog is always so dramatic!

Hypocritical

If someone is hypocritical, they act in contradiction of their stated values. A hypocritical tone can be used as humor to mock one’s own shortcomings.

Examples of sentences with a hypocritical tone include:

– Don’t be late like me.

– I didn’t know any better. You should!

Impartial

An impartial tone is typically used to describe something without revealing any personal preference. This type of writing is most often seen in news articles or blogs where there are multiple viewpoints on a given topic. An impartial tone does not take sides. Instead, the author provides the audience with an accurate account of what’s happening without any bias towards one opinion over another.

Examples of sentences with an impartial tone include:

– The two teams came into the game evenly matched, and they both performed well today despite injuries and other obstacles brought about by playing so late at night.

– Please do your best to keep this discussion respectful. We want a productive debate on this issue.

Impassioned

An impassioned tone is typically used when the writer is trying to make somebody feel the same strong feelings as them. It’s not too much of a stretch to say that an impassioned tone brings out emotion within the reader. Sentences with this type of tone often have very strong feelings or emotions involved, and it can be hard for people to read these types of sentences without feeling involved themselves.

Examples of sentences with an impassioned tone include:

– I was madly in love with him.

– The tears were streaming down his cheeks as the regret surged for what he had done.

Imploring

An imploring tone is typically used to convey sincerity or regret. The feeling of earnestness is commonly found in imploring writing because it uses language that emphasizes the writer’s need for help, attention, or understanding. There are usually no direct commands present in an imploratory sentence but rather a more implicit request for some type of support or assistance from the audience.

Examples of sentences with an imploring tone include:

– Please help me out.

– I am so sorry.

Impressionable

An impressionable tone is typically used when someone is moved by something, such as a persuasive argument. This type of writing may praise people who may not yet have reached success, as long as the author is impressed by what they’ve seen so far.

Examples of sentences with an impressionable tone include:

– You’re really talented at drawing!

– Your project seems to be off to a great start!

Incensed

An incensed tone is typically used in writing when somebody or something infuriates the writer. It can also be used to describe a situation that is emotionally disturbing for the speaker, such as being betrayed by someone they trust. The incensed tone often displays anger and upset and may sometimes have an edge of urgency.

Examples of sentences with an incensed tone include:

– How dare you insult me!

– You’re fired!

Incredulous

An incredulous tone is used when somebody finds something to be highly unlikely. An incredulous tone does not necessarily have a positive connotation, so it can show frustration with the subject.

Examples of sentences with an incredulous tone include:

– I can’t understand why you feel that way because I never said anything like that.

– That’s impossible!

Indignant

An indignant tone is typically used when somebody is angry or frustrated with a situation. It can also be used as a way to expose someone’s wrongdoing, such as in an article about corruption. This tone of voice often has an aggressive undertone and may come across as bitter or impertinent.

Examples of sentences with an indignant tone include:

– I’m really tired! How long are we going to do this?

– That place clearly sucks!

Intense

An intense tone is typically used when the writer needs to express a strong opinion. The intensity provides clarity and forcefulness. A sentence written with this type of tone may discuss controversial topics or have connotations that are negative or dangerous.

Examples of sentences with an intense tone include:

– I find it offensive how you always ask me out for drinks whenever we are together!

– It’s my right to decide what kind of relationship I want!

Intimate

An intimate tone is typically reserved for personal conversations, such as a letter to someone dear. This type of writing often has a friendly and informal feel. The tone can be used when there is an element of trust or closeness between the writer and reader, which makes it appropriate for conveying private information about one person’s life.

Examples of sentences with an intimate tone include:

– I hope you’re doing well!

– Your mom was telling me all about what happened last night. Are you okay?

Ironic

An ironic tone uses a combination of sarcasm and humor. It’s used when you’re poking fun at somebody or something while still maintaining a friendly feel. An ironic tone can be either gently mocking or cheerful, depending on how it’s meant to come across. Even though this type of writing has its place in many fields, there are instances, including journalism and advertising, where irony might not always be appropriate. An ironic tone is often used by people who are trying to make lighthearted jokes about serious topics, such as murder cases or other tragic events that take place around them. With an ironic tone, speakers often say the opposite of what they feel.

Examples of sentences with an ironic tone include:

– What a coincidence! My mom got me into this program too!

– This is great weather for a funeral.

Irreverent

An irreverent tone is typically used when the writer is trying to lighten up a situation or deliver humor. Speakers using an irreverent tone often don’t take themselves too seriously and can be both playful and sarcastic at times. Irreverent writing can also poke fun at something without intending any harm, but one should make sure to consider the seriousness of its subject matter to avoid sounding crass.

Examples of sentences with an irreverent tone include:

– I don’t care what the experts say.

– Lighten up; it’s just your marriage.

Jaded

A jaded tone is often used when the writer has lost hope in their work or life. A jaded tone doesn’t always have to be fully negative, but it does communicate a pessimistic opinion of one’s self, the world, or society as a whole. A jaded tone is not very warm nor inviting towards others; people may be discouraged from engaging with someone who uses this type of voice.

Examples of sentences with a jaded tone include:

– I can’t find any meaning in life anymore.

– If you’re looking for answers, I don’t think you’re going to find them.

Joyful

A joyful tone is used when celebrating something. It would be appropriate when writing about celebrations or events that are fun to read about. A writer uses a joyous tone when they want to make their audience feel better by using positive language and imagery. This way they not only enjoy themselves but also help build up someone else’s mood.

Examples of sentences with a joyful tone include:

– How wonderful!

– We’re having such a good time tonight!

Judgmental

A judgmental tone is typically used when somebody makes a critical or harsh remark. For example, if someone were writing an article about their worst class of the semester and they had to write a paragraph on what went wrong, that paragraph might be written in a judgmental tone. A judgmental tone can also come from published opinion columns in which the author looks down on the subject.

Examples of sentences with a judgmental tone include:

– The professor is not good enough!

– You need more effort put into your work.

Laudatory

A laudatory tone is characterized by praise, adoration, or appreciation. This type of writing often has a positive connotation and is usually somewhat formal. A person might use a formal phrase such as “I would like to acknowledge,” for example. Laudatory sentences are written with an air of reverence or solemnity and likely include words such as “you” or “your.”

Examples of sentences with a laudatory tone Include:

– You are truly dedicated.

– Your work inspires me.

Lighthearted

A lighthearted tone is used when the writer does not take anything very seriously. Lighthearted writing is generally casual and usually uses humor to put the audience at ease. The tone of a lighthearted text typically has some sort of playfulness or silliness in what’s being written about so that the reader doesn’t feel too serious about the topic.

Examples of sentences with a lighthearted tone include:

– I’d tell them they’re welcome to come back, but they’re not!

– It’s not a big deal. I know how you can fix this.

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Loving

A loving tone is typically used when people are talking to or about a close friend or family member. It can also be used in formal settings when the speaker expresses affection for someone special, such as a romantic partner or child. A sentence with a loving tone conveys warmth and intimacy towards its subject, often using words like “my,” “our,” and other personal pronouns. This is appropriate when writing about something that has been shared between two people who care deeply for one another, such as marriage vows exchanged by newlyweds at their wedding.

Examples of sentences with a loving tone include:

– I loved the time we spent together!

– Let’s hang out on Friday night—we always have so much fun!

Macabre

A macabre tone is typically used when writing about death, violence, and other dark subjects. This tone can be found in horror texts, such as gothic novels. The reader should expect a sense of fear or dread because the writer has decided to evoke that feeling.

Examples of sentences with a macabre tone include:

– I’m scared for my life!

– Nobody survived.

Malicious

A malicious tone is often used when people are trying to hurt someone emotionally. The tone in this type of writing is usually aggressive and can come with a sense of anger, blame, resentment, entitlement, manipulation, or guilt. A malicious tone might be found in gossip articles that seek to ruin someone’s reputation.

Examples of sentences with a malicious tone include:

– Don’t get upset if you’re not invited to my party!

– I always have good taste. You’re the worst.

Mean-spirited

A mean-spirited tone is typically used when the writer is expressing their anger towards somebody or something. Mean-spirited writing implies that the subject is not worth wasting words on and should be dismissed. Mean-spirited sentences have a very negative connotation, which might make sense if someone is angrily talking about how they feel after getting scammed.

Examples of sentences with a mean-spirited tone include:

– I’m never buying from you again!

– I want nothing to do with you.

Mischievous

A mischievous tone can be used when the speaker talks about something too good to be true. The writer in this case seeks to earn someone’s trust to exploit them for personal gain. This can also be used for humor by misleading someone as a joke. 

Examples of sentences with a mischievous tone include:

– If you’re going to Australia, watch out for drop bears!

– I’m sorry you feel like we were trying to take advantage of you; we would never do that!

Mocking

A mocking tone is typically used to ridicule or make fun of someone. The mockery comes across as sarcastic and might contain a condescending remark about the subject at hand. While it can be seen in writing, people generally use this tone in speech.

Examples of sentences with a mocking tone include:

– I was looking forward to your performance but you totally blew it!

– Why do I always have to lead you by the hand?

Mourning

A mourning tone is something that often appears in writing when somebody feels regret or sadness after experiencing a loss. The tone can take different forms, from complimenting someone who has passed away to expressing profound sadness. A mourning tone expresses more sadness than an admiring tone, and it may display seriousness or pity. Sentences with a mourning tone usually express grief about the subject matter.

Examples of sentences with a mourning tone include:

– I’m sorry for your loss.

– It’s too late; all I have now are the memories.

Naïve

A naïve tone is typically used when a writer lacks a full understanding of something, such as human nature or another general concept. As the name suggests, this style of writing has an innocence to it that might make the audience feel better about themselves for understanding what’s going on. However, there might also be hidden meanings behind some sentences or phrases to show that the audience doesn’t fully understand either.

Examples of sentences with a naïve tone include:

– I can’t believe someone would steal from that store! There’s even a sign that says, “No shoplifting”!

– Doesn’t everyone study over spring break?

Narcissistic

A narcissistic tone is often used in writing when people want to emphasize their importance and power. Narcissistic writing has a sense of entitlement and self-indulgence because the writer is bragging about themself or trying to show off. The tone typically comes across as fawning or self-absorbed because it seems like the writer does not care much for anyone else.

Examples of sentences with a narcissistic tone include:

– I’m so amazing!

– I should write a memoir.

Nasty

A nasty tone is typically used when the writer wants to convey negative emotions like anger, frustration, or hate. This type of writing may cause the reader to feel discomfort. A nasty tone can be found in sentences where there are insults or put-downs of other people’s personal characteristics.

Examples of sentences with a nasty tone include:

– You’re ugly!

– You did a terrible job on that presentation last week.

Negative

A negative tone often appears in writing when someone is expressing a low opinion of something or somebody. The speaker’s voice might have a sense of frustration and defeat as if the subject isn’t worth their time. Sentences with a negative tone generally show a disagreement with their subjects, meaning that sentences written in this way describe things you don’t like or people who aren’t doing what they need to do.

Examples of sentences with a negative tone include:

– Success is impossible!

– You’ve done everything wrong again.

Nostalgic

Nostalgic writing is typically used when the writer describes memories that they feel sentimental about. A nostalgic tone can be seen as more of a thought or feeling than a concrete statement, but it still provides information about what was happening at the time in question. A nostalgic tone is often found in literature and other types of writing where readers can get a glimpse into somebody’s childhood by reading sentences with phrases like “when I was your age.”

Examples of sentences with a nostalgic tone include:

– The old days were so much better!

– When I think back on my high school years, I wish I was young again.

Objective

An objective tone is used when explaining or describing an idea, place, or event. Objective writing avoids stating any personal feelings about what’s being explained and simply provides facts with no bias. The goal of objective writing is to help somebody else understand something by providing information only. The audience can then form their own opinion.

Examples of sentences with an objective tone include:

– There are many different species within the animal kingdom.

– New York is 205 miles from here.

Obsequious

An obsequious tone is typically used when a writer is trying to ingratiate themselves with somebody else. For some, this could feel too familiar and cause offense, while others may find it charming. The intent of an obsequious tone depends on the context in which it appears and the message the writer wants to convey. Examples of an obsequious tone might be someone asking their boss for a raise during a performance review or begging forgiveness from someone they have wronged in some way.

Examples of sentences with an obsequious tone include:

– I am so, so sorry that I offended you!

– I know you’re very generous. Please consider giving me the extra 5%.

Optimistic

An optimistic tone is typically used when the writer is trying to make somebody feel better about something they are going through. An optimistic tone is all about positivity. Optimistic writing tries its best not just to be uplifting but also to make the audience feel good about themselves and their future prospects. Usually, an optimistic tone attempts to boost the audience’s mood or strengthen their determination towards achieving a particular goal, as well as giving them hope for what will come next.

Examples of sentences with an optimistic tone include:

– It’s okay if you weren’t able to find your keys; we can start looking again tomorrow morning after breakfast!

– He’s probably interested. You should call him back.

Outraged

An outraged tone is typically used when the speaker or writer wants to express their anger towards something. This can be a negative event that has recently happened, someone showing a lack of understanding, or another type of injustice. An outraged tone is generally negative about something external but also shows internal anger and frustration. Sentences with this tone might contain profanity or curse words as well as phrases like “I’m not going to take it anymore.”

Examples of sentences with an outraged tone include:

– It’s unfair how people on my team get paid more than me!

– I’m so angry right now. I feel sickened by what she said about her cousin during dinner last night.

Outspoken

An outspoken tone is typically used when somebody is talking about an emotional or controversial subject. This includes any issue that could be deemed taboo because it brings attention to something many people are reluctant to talk about. Outspoken writing can also describe an article that comes across as bluntly honest and straightforward without being disrespectful. The tone describes the writer’s opinion on how things should be done.

Examples of sentences with an outspoken tone include:

– No matter how long it’s been in place, this policy needs to change.

– What he said was very racist.

Patronizing

A patronizing tone is typically used in writing when somebody is trying to show dominance or superiority. A patronizing tone can be found in situations where the writer feels that they are better than the person they are talking to. The tone often has an air of condescension and it shows a lack of respect for others.

Examples of sentences with a patronizing tone include:

– You’re not even worth my time!

– I see you’re struggling today. You need my help to get out of this mess.

Pensive

A pensive tone is often found in literature and describes a kind of introspective, thoughtful feeling. A pensive sentence usually has an air of uncertainty about it and often deals with something new or unfamiliar. Pensive sentences are usually written from the first-person point of view to make the writing more personal and relatable for the audience.

Examples of sentences with a pensive tone include:

– I’m starting to worry now; what if my grades start slipping?

– I’ve never felt this way before.

Persuasive

A writer uses a persuasive tone when trying to convince somebody else to see things from a particular point of view. A persuasive tone uses reasoning and evidence-based arguments or emotional appeals to try and change the reader’s perspective on an issue or make them agree with something. The tone can be seen as aggressive, but it is usually not hostile towards the audience. The writer instead seeks to gain understanding through logic, reason, truthfulness, or responsiveness.

Examples of sentences with a persuasive tone include:

– Let’s go eat lunch. I’m sure you’ll like the restaurant.

– It’s getting dark, so we should start heading home now.

Pessimistic

A pessimistic tone can appear in writing when somebody is feeling hopeless or devastated about something. This tone usually takes the form of a narrative that reflects on how much worse things may get before they start to improve, and it often has an emotional undertone. Sentences with this tone sound negative; sentences will likely be filled with words like “not,” “never,” and adjectives expressing poor outcomes.

Examples of sentences with a pessimistic tone include:

– They’re never going to approve your plan without you changing your approach!

– I’m so fed up. I didn’t think things could get this bad.

Philosophical

A philosophical tone is often used in writing that focuses on an abstract topic or idea, and it can be found in both fiction and nonfiction. A philosophical tone typically shows that the writer is analyzing something within a particular framework rather than just presenting information. The distinctive quality of this tone of voice is questioning everything, as the speaker seeks answers about what makes sense before sharing those ideas with others. A philosophical tone is usually formal because it employs abstract expressions to convey ideas about the world or universe.

Examples of sentences with a philosophical tone include:

– What if we decide not to do anything?

– I wonder why my life is this way.

Playful

A playful tone is very common. This tone often has an air of innocence and can sometimes be seen as frivolous or not serious, but it doesn’t lack creativity. The playful tone gives off a sense that everything will work out in time by using wit to make light of people or situations. For example, you might react to your boss’s bad mood with humor instead of aggression.

Examples of sentences with a playful tone include:

– I never thought my teacher would have so much trouble understanding my writing!

– This is quite a conundrum!

Pragmatic

A pragmatic tone is typically used when information has to be delivered in a short amount of time. The speaker focuses on practical solutions and results. A pragmatic tone can appear in either written or spoken language, but it can also be conveyed through body language and environmental factors.

Examples of sentences with a pragmatic tone include:

– Although it might be difficult, you need to tell the truth to fix this.

– Did that work out the way we wanted?

Pretentious

A pretentious tone is typically used when the writer feels that he or she has something to teach somebody. This type of writing can be condescending and arrogant because it assumes a certain lack of knowledge on the part of the audience. While many people might see a pretentious tone as just annoying, others might find this type of speech insightful and thought-provoking if it comes from someone they look up to.

Examples of sentences with a pretentious tone include:

– To get ahead, you need to learn how to be the best.

– This theory is probably beyond your understanding.

Regretful

A regretful tone is typically used when people express heartbreak, disappointment, or remorse. The tone can take different forms, including being apologetic and sympathetic. Sentences with a regretful tone usually have a negative connotation because they relate to feelings about something bad that happened or situations where someone acted immorally.

Examples of sentences with a regrettable tone include:

– I feel sorry for what happened to you during your first day at school today.

– I should have helped you this morning instead of pushing you so hard.

Resentful

A resentful tone often appears in writing when someone feels betrayed or upset by something that happened to them. A resentful tone is typically aggressive and hostile, and it implies a lack of trust in the relationship between the writer and subject matter. The voice usually shows anger. Sentences with this type of tone are sometimes accusatory towards a particular person.

Examples of sentences with a resentful tone include:

– I don’t think you’re being honest about this project!

– It’s your fault we lost our jobs.

Resigned

A resigned tone is typically used when the writer feels hopeless about a situation. The tone can also be used for people who don’t want to disappoint somebody else but would rather go with the flow than try to force changes. Resigned writing usually comes across as pessimistic or numb, which might create an uncomfortable feeling for the reader if it’s too long-winded. Often, readers find this type of tone dull because it’s not very motivating or inspirational—it doesn’t offer many options besides resignation itself.

Examples of sentences with a resigned tone include:

– I know you didn’t mean that; I’m just sick of trying to make this work.

– This situation will never get any better.

Restrained

A restrained tone is typically used when the writer holds something back, such as information or emotions. A restrained tone often implies a sense of mystery and confidentiality, as well as calm. This can show many different shades of meaning depending on the situation; the speaker could be concealing anger, love, or a scandalous secret.

Examples of sentences with a restrained tone include:

– I don’t have any opinion on my boss.

– I’m not supposed to reveal much, so don’t tell anybody about this.

Reverent

A reverent tone is typically used when people are writing about things they look up to or respect. This is particularly associated with religion. A reverent tone can be seen in texts that express wonder for the subject, as well as spirituality or religious beliefs. Texts with a reverent tone often use words like “God,” “Lord,” and other religious terms.

Examples of sentences with a reverent tone include:

– How I wish there were more saints like you.

– We all need God’s love.

Ridiculous

A ridiculous tone can be described as being very far-fetched or inane. Often, the subject matter with a ridiculous tone is off-topic or irrelevant to what a reader would expect. On some occasions, it may also seem like the writer does not think their audience will believe them but still tries anyway. A ridiculous tone might sound disrespectful towards the audience if they feel it is too absurd or they don’t understand the humor.

Examples of sentences with a ridiculous tone include:

– This report says there’s a new type of fish called Dorito Fish.

– And that’s why I couldn’t finish my homework.

Righteous

A righteous tone can sometimes be confused with an annoyed or frustrated tone. A righteous tone is commonly used in writing when the writer is defending their belief system, such as upholding a particular cause. A righteous tone has two major components: a sense of knowledge and passion about what’s being discussed and some sort of virtuousness that implies moral authority over the audience (through education or experience).

Examples of sentences with a righteous tone include:

– I’ll show you the proper way to act.

– You’re making things worse by doing this.

Sarcastic

Sarcastic writing is often used as a form of humor. It can be insulting or witty depending on the tone and style of the writer. In addition, a sarcastic tone is typically more common in speech than in written work because the way the words are spoken is usually important. An ironic twist often accompanies this type of writing for humorous effect. For example, an author could state something absurdly optimistic while implying the opposite meaning or mix a negative opinion about one thing with praise for another.

Examples of sentences with a sarcastic tone include:

– I am so upset that my perfect life has been ruined by this homework assignment!

– Oh yes, everyone loves you here.

Satirical

A satirical tone can be expressed in writing through sarcasm, exaggerated feelings, and deceptive language. A satirical tone is typically used to poke fun at or criticize something or someone, particularly a public figure. In contrast to a sarcastic tone, a satirical tone is less aggressive and isn’t usually intended to be offensive. It often takes the form of jokes but also has other purposes, such as delivering political commentary by taking a completely different stance on a highly controversial topic.

Examples of sentences with a satirical tone include:

– Although the program was a complete failure, I’m sure we can all agree that this money was well spent.

– We might be able to find a better leader. Anyone, really.

Scathing

A scathing tone is used when the writer feels a strong need to make a negative argument or express their frustrations with something. This type of writing usually has a lot of hostility, sometimes using sarcasm but often being direct. It can be seen as aggressive and accusatory.

Examples of sentences with a scathing tone include:

– The article seems very biased. I’m going to have to disagree with that opinion!

– That was unsafe. You’re lucky you didn’t get your car totaled!

Scornful

A scornful tone is typically used when the writer is trying to show that they dislike somebody. A scornful tone looks down on, criticizes, or belittles the subject in a way that might seek to make people change their state of mind or behavior. Sentences with a disdainful or scathing tone usually criticize someone personally or take other actions such as name-calling and attacking one’s character by questioning their motives.

Examples of sentences with a scornful tone include:

– That was careless!

– You thought that was an okay thing to do? Really?

Sensationalistic

A sensationalistic tone is used in writing to create a sense of excitement. The tone usually comes across as dramatic, with words that are meant to make an emotional impact on the audience. Sensationalistic writing often displays qualities such as exaggeration or dramatization. Since sensationalism aims at thrilling its audience, it can come off more like propaganda than an informative piece of work.

Examples of sentences with a sensationalistic tone include:

– Is he really dead?

– You won’t believe what happens next!

Sentimental

A sentimental tone is typically used when the writer wants to share memories or feelings about something special or personal. The tone can be compassionate, nostalgic, or reflective of current events in the world. Sentimental writing often focuses more on feelings and emotions than it does facts and ideas. A sentimental tone is usually emotionally charged because the speaker expresses feelings rather than logic.

Examples of sentences with a sentimental tone include:

– It was hard for me to say goodbye, but I am really happy about what you’re planning to do next!

– Marrying my high school sweetheart felt like a dream come true.

Sincere

A sincere tone is typically used when the writer is trying to convey a sense of truth or honesty. With a sincere tone, the speaker does not put on airs. Sincere sentences usually have an authentic feeling to them due to their lack of pretense and rhetorical flourishes.

Examples of sentences with a sincere tone include:

– It was freezing out there today! You must be cold.

– I’m sorry for being so nasty yesterday at work. I was having a very stressful day.

Skeptical

A skeptical tone can be used in writing when the writer is expressing doubt about something. It often appears in a formal setting, such as academic papers or official documents, with a great emphasis on accuracy. This tone is also often common in investigative journalism.

Examples of sentences with a skeptical tone include:

– The results reported by this study are unreliable because they were not peer-reviewed prior to publication.

– This product has ingredients that have been shown to cause cancer and other diseases if ingested over time.

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Solemn

A solemn tone is typically used when the writer has a very serious topic to discuss. It’s often used in writing about death or other negative topics that call for sympathy from readers. It can also show that the writer is expressing sympathy. A solemn voice might be more formal than an enthusiastic one, because it exhibits a seriousness and gravity appropriate when writing something tragic or dealing with death, such as in obituaries or funeral services.

Examples of sentences with a solemn tone include:

– Emma passed away yesterday at 2 pm after battling cancer for three years.

– On what could have been his last day alive, he made a courageous decision.

Subjective

A subjective tone is the type of writing that primarily uses feelings to convey meaning. It’s often used when someone is very emotional about something, whether this concerns positive or negative emotions. The tone can also be used for both humorous and sincere purposes in a piece written by someone who has an interesting point of view on life or their experiences. A subjective tone can display emotion without giving too much detail into what exactly the writer means when there are many different interpretations.

Examples of sentences with a subjective tone include:

– I think this party was terrible!

– I feel like everybody will be interested in this book.

Submissive

A submissive tone is typically used when someone is following orders or trying to show agreement. A submissive tone usually expresses that someone wants approval. A person using this tone may feel that there are no other options than pleasing the speaker.

Examples of sentences with a submissive tone include:

– I’ll do it your way.

– I’ve followed your instructions to the letter.

Sulking

A sulking tone is typically used when somebody is feeling upset, frustrated, or even moderately angry about something. This tone has a negative connotation that can be sensed in the speaker’s voice. A sentence with this tone usually reflects feelings of loneliness and sorrow, and the speaker may blame others for the situation they are going through.

Examples of sentences with a sulking tone include:

– I don’t know why you did what you did.

– That was so inconsiderate.

Surprised

A surprised tone is used when the writer wants to express awe or amazement. Surprised writing often includes metaphors and imagery to show exaggeration. Typically, a surprised tone has an emotional impact on its audience because it tries to capture a larger-than-life feeling.

Examples of sentences with a surprised tone include:

– I can’t believe this happened!

– The fireworks tonight were mind-blowing!

Sympathetic

A sympathetic tone is usually used when the writer wants to show that they feel the pain of somebody who is going through a difficult time. The sympathy comes from an understanding of how they are feeling by having gone through that same experience or understanding it well. In contrast with empathy, sympathy means sharing the same feelings as someone else. Sentences with a sympathetic tone often have sad connotations because they reflect topics like regret, loss, and hope for future happiness.

Examples of sentences with a sympathetic tone include:

– You must be so disappointed after waiting all year for your team to make the playoffs, only to fall short.

– I feel sorry for you right now.

Tolerant

A tolerant tone is typically used in writing when the writer wants to show compassion for someone who has done something wrong or has views that are different from their own. The tone can be seen as being at peace with what somebody else says, even if not fully understanding. Tolerance doesn’t mean adopting someone else’s views but rather being patient in considering people’s differences instead of reacting negatively.

Examples of sentences with a tolerant tone include:

– I’m not sure I agree with what you said to your sister. Can you tell me more about what happened?

– Let your kids know that you love them no matter what!

Tragic

A tragic tone is typically seen as sad and heartfelt, often describing a dark or depressing situation. The tone is most commonly used in writing about death or tragedies such as natural disasters. A tragic tone can be used to show the experience of someone who has experienced a loss. A tragic tone doesn’t focus on concrete solutions to problems but rather tries to explore how people feel and how they recover mentally and physically to move forward.

Examples of sentences with a tragic tone include:

– I remember the horror of the night when all this happened.

– She’s been struggling since her parents passed away last year.

Unassuming

An unassuming tone is typically used when the writer feels humble or conscious of their lack of knowledge. The tone can often sound polite because it doesn’t command authority. An unassuming tone can be used to express thoughts on a topic without claiming expertise.

Examples of sentences with an unassuming tone include:

– I feel pretty insecure about myself these days, and I’m not sure how I should go forward.

– You seem to know what you’re doing. Can you show me?

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Uneasy

An uncomfortable tone is typically used when the writer feels unsure about something or is hesitant to write about a topic. They might have conflicting thoughts on whether their opinion should be released publicly for fear that it could embarrass them or draw negative attention. They also might just think that the topic is unpleasant.

Examples of sentences with an uneasy tone include:

– This was not a fun article to write.

– I’m not comfortable releasing this information publicly and would like to keep it confidential for the time being.

Urgent

An urgent tone is typically used when the writer has a sense that something needs to be done quickly. The urgency can come from both external and internal sources. An outside source could be a deadline or a breaking news story, which often require quick action or a response on behalf of the reader. An internal source could be strong emotions, such as fear that something bad will happen if action isn’t taken.

Examples of sentences with an urgent tone include:

– Please read this article as soon as possible! You need to decide whether we should proceed with tomorrow night’s show at your venue.

– To win this race, I need you all to do one more push now.

Vindictive

A vindictive tone often appears in writing when the writer is expressing anger, hatred, or resentment for something and wants to take revenge. The tone often sounds insulting, aggressive, or spiteful. A vindictive tone might be used by politicians trying to cast blame on one another.

Examples of sentences with a vindictive tone include:

– I cannot believe you did this!

– That’s it! I’m going to tell everyone why he dumped me in high school!

Virtuous

A virtuous tone is used in writing when someone is trying to recommend an action or make a moral statement. The tone can take different forms, from being complimentary to being commanding. While a virtuous tone might be more formal than an admiring or encouraging tone, it still displays confidence and enthusiasm. Sentences with a virtuous tone typically have a positive connotation because they promote values such as honesty and integrity in words and actions. Furthermore, sentences that use this tone are often written by people who want others to do good deeds or show appreciation towards others’ actions without asking for anything in return.

Examples of sentences with a virtuous tone include:

– You should look into getting some financial advice.

– That was a very warm gesture. Thank you.

Weary

A weary tone is typically used when a person has been through a lot, either emotionally or physically. This tone shows that the speaker is tired and feeling beaten down from being in difficult conditions. This tone often speaks to those who have gone through trauma and can sound very pessimistic.

Examples of sentences with a weary tone include:

– I’ve had enough. Let’s head home for good.

– I’m in a lot of trouble. There’s no easy solution.

Whimsical

A whimsical tone is often used in creative writing, such as poetry or fiction. This type of voice can be playful and fun-spirited while also being candid. The tone has a lightheartedness to it that makes the reader feel like they are part of an experience with someone else who is having fun. A whimsical tone tends to describe something amusing or enjoyable; things could get silly.

Examples of sentences with a whimsical tone include:

– That was a bizarre experience, and I’m not sure whether to laugh or cry.

– As I went out into my backyard just now, I saw a weird frog. It looked like your aunt!

Worried

A worried tone is typically used when somebody is feeling anxious, insecure, or frustrated about something. This tone might be used following a sentence that announced something upsetting to explain the writer’s reaction. Worrying sentences are usually punctuated by words that describe uncertainty and doubt such as “maybe” and “perhaps.” A worried tone would also characterize someone who does not understand why they are experiencing certain feelings of anxiety or insecurity.

Examples of sentences with a worried tone include:

– Let’s stay home tonight. There’s too much unrest in this city.

– I’m so embarrassed. What will people think?

Wretched

A wretched tone is typically used for describing something that has caused great suffering to the writer or subject. It may come across as an aggressive voice as pain is expressed. Sentences in a wretched tone are always negative, with most of them expressing anger and resentment towards somebody or some event. The use of this tone may also signal someone who finds themselves reflecting on painful memories from their past experiences which still cause adverse effects today.

Examples of sentences with a wretched tone include:

– I’m so frustrated by how my parents raised me.

– She was not welcome back home after being away for over six months. It would take much longer to heal.

How to write your content with AI in a specific tone? Setting the tone of writing using Outranking

When you use Outranking’s AI-powered writing tools, you can set the tone of voice. To do this, click the gear icon beside Write for me on the bottom toolbar:

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You can then type in any tone of voice from the above list, or any other tone of voice you can imagine!

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For example, you can use this tone with our Methods to start your article. Click Methods in the right menu, then search for or select Brilliant Introductions. This allows you to generate an introduction with your chosen tone of voice.

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Click Command. Outranking writes your introduction for you. It’s that simple.

How to rewrite a paragraph in a different tone using Outranking

You can also use Outranking to rewrite text in a different tone of voice. In the Methods list above, look for Change tone of a given passage:

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Select a paragraph of your text, then click Command. Type in any tone of voice and click the button to confirm:

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That’s it! Outranking automatically rewrites your text.

Pankil Shah
Pankil Shah
Co-founder @ Outranking.io